Five Interesting Things I Learned Because I Read “Things Fall Apart”

“Things Fall Apart”, by Chinua Achebe, was on the syllabus for my daughters’ (yes, plural) world literature class. As I like to do sometimes, I read it with them. First published in 1958, it tells the story Okonkwo, a respected warrior, and his village in Nigeria as they both struggle to adapt to colonization. I’m not going to review it because I feel silly reviewing classics. I’ll just say I’m glad I read it and I encourage you to read it, too. It’s a short book and written in simple, but meaningful, language. It doesn’t require a big time investment and you’re likely to learn some interesting things. Continue reading

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Book Review: “Something in the Water”, by Catherine Steadman

Erin and Mark are honeymooning in Bora Bora when they discover something completely unexpected floating in the water. It could be the answer to their prayers or it could rip apart their fledgling marriage. Will they do the right thing? Continue reading

Help me fight ALS!

Dear Readers,

Many of you know that I have been fighting ALS since 2011. The name of my blog, Book Thoughts from Bed, alludes to the fact that I’ve been mostly confined to a hospital bed for the last 4 1/2 years due to the fact that ALS has taken away my ability to move. Yeah, it sucks, but I’m well cared for thanks to family, friends and the Veterans Administration. Unfortunately, not all people with ALS can say the same. That’s where the ALS Association comes in. ALSA provides much needed services, care and research. Their biggest fundraiser is their local walks. The one in my area is coming up and I really need to step up my fundraising.

Please consider donating to the walk. You can do that by clicking on this link: http://web.alsa.org/site/TR?fr_id=13240&pg=personal&px=3278042&s_hasSecureSession=true

Thank you!
Michelle

Book Review: “The Summer Wives”, by Beatriz Williams

“The Summer Wives” is an engrossing novel, set in a time and place where wealthy families summered in island mansions off the coast of New England, over-drank regularly at their exclusive clubs and played a lot of bridge (actually, they probably still do most of that). It explores themes of love, family and social class in a way that is sometimes melancholy, sometimes hopeful and always engaging. Continue reading