Five Interesting Things I Learned Because I Read “Things Fall Apart”

“Things Fall Apart”, by Chinua Achebe, was on the syllabus for my daughters’ (yes, plural) world literature class. As I like to do sometimes, I read it with them. First published in 1958, it tells the story Okonkwo, a respected warrior, and his village in Nigeria as they both struggle to adapt to colonization. I’m not going to review it because I feel silly reviewing classics. I’ll just say I’m glad I read it and I encourage you to read it, too. It’s a short book and written in simple, but meaningful, language. It doesn’t require a big time investment and you’re likely to learn some interesting things. Continue reading

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Help me fight ALS!

Dear Readers,

Many of you know that I have been fighting ALS since 2011. The name of my blog, Book Thoughts from Bed, alludes to the fact that I’ve been mostly confined to a hospital bed for the last 4 1/2 years due to the fact that ALS has taken away my ability to move. Yeah, it sucks, but I’m well cared for thanks to family, friends and the Veterans Administration. Unfortunately, not all people with ALS can say the same. That’s where the ALS Association comes in. ALSA provides much needed services, care and research. Their biggest fundraiser is their local walks. The one in my area is coming up and I really need to step up my fundraising.

Please consider donating to the walk. You can do that by clicking on this link: http://web.alsa.org/site/TR?fr_id=13240&pg=personal&px=3278042&s_hasSecureSession=true

Thank you!
Michelle

Fundraiser to Fight ALS

I was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) six years ago. It’s been a hard road. It started as a little bit of weakness in my foot and within three and a half years I was paralyzed and on a ventilator. I need 24/7 care but private insurance and Medicare don’t cover that. But there are patients in worse situations than me. Thankfully, we have the ALS Association to fill some of that support gap. Continue reading

5 Ways to Encourage Reading in the Kansas City Area

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It’s not breaking news that not enough Americans read books. According to commonly cited statistics, 33% of US high school graduates will never read a book after graduation. Even if everyone was inclined to read, only 50% of US adults can do so at or above an 8th grade level. And 60% of inmates can’t read at all, so read between the lines about the effects of being illiterate. Continue reading